Teeth Whitening

So what is Teeth Whitening really all about? The following report includes some fascinating information about Teeth Whitening–info you can use.

Tooth bleaching, also known as tooth whitening, is a common procedure in general dentistry but most especially in the field of cosmetic dentistry. Many people consider white teeth to be an attractive feature of a smile. A child’s deciduous teeth are generally whiter than the adult teeth that follow. As a person ages the adult teeth often increase in value–that is to say, they become darker. This darkening is due to changes in the mineral structure of the tooth, as the enamel becomes less porous. Teeth can also become stained by bacterial pigments, foodstuffs and tobacco.

As white teeth are subconsciously associated with youth, they have become desirable. This has been made more apparent with the spread of American culture worldwide, where an especially white smile is coined a “Hollywood smile.” The procedure to bleach teeth uses oxidising agents such as hydrogen peroxide to lighten the shade of the tooth. The oxidising agent penetrates the porosities in the rod-like crystal structure of enamel and oxidises interprismatic stain deposits; over a period of time, the dentine layer, lying underneath the enamel, is also bleached.

There are two main methods of bleaching. The first involves applying a high concentration of oxidising agent for a short period of time, which is the so-called office bleach. This produces quick results but risks chemical burns to the soft tissues. Therefore, most in-office bleaching procedures use a light-cured protective layer that is carefully painted on the gums and papilla (the tips of the gums between the teeth). The bleaching agent is either carbamide peroxide, which breaks down in the mouth to form hydrogen peroxide, or hydrogen peroxide itself. The bleaching gel typically contains up to 35% hydrogen peroxide equivalent.

The alternative method involves using a thin mouthguard or strip to hold a low concentration of oxidising agent next to the teeth for as long as several hours a day for a period of 5 to 14 days. This is known as take-home or over-the-counter bleaching. This is a slower process but has fewer risks to the soft tissues. The bleaching agent is typically less than 10% hydrogen peroxide equivalent.

A typical course of bleaching can produce dramatic improvements in the cosmetic appearance of most stained teeth; however, some stains do not respond to bleaching. Tetracycline staining may require prolonged bleaching, as it takes longer for the bleach to reach the dentine layer. White-spot decalcifications may also be highlighted and become more noticeable.

Recently, efforts have been made to accelerate the bleaching process by the use of light. Studies have shown varying results as to the efficacy of light-activated bleaching.

Side effects of tooth bleaching include chemical burns (if a high-concentration oxidizing agent contacts unprotected tissues, which may bleach or discolor mucous membranes), sensitive teeth, and overbleaching (known in the profession as “fridge-door teeth”). Rebound, or teeth losing the bleached effect and darkening, is also an issue, with some studies showing the rebound effect over 30 days. A recent study by Kugel et al has shown that as much as 4 shades of lightness can be lost over 30 days with light-activated/office bleaching.

Rough Tartar Deposits, Gum Crevices Causes Gum Tissues Inflamed, Attract Bacteria

Most dentists seem to be in agreement now that the irritation of rough tartar deposits (calculus) which accumulate in the gum crevices causes the gum tissue to become inflamed and to attract bacteria. When these deposits are not thoroughly scaled from teeth by a dental hygienist or dentist, more and more calculus accumulates and more and more bacteria gather and live in the gum crevice. As the process continues, there occurs a gradual destruction of the gum fibers which hold the gum to the teeth. This is accompanied by an eating away of the bone which supports the tooth, an accumulation of even more numbers of bacteria, and a foulness of the breath.

If treatment is not instituted, the teeth will lose their bony support and eventually become very loose, and, if not extracted, will fall out of their own accord.

Dr. Price held views regarding pyorrhea similar to these, saying these were the beliefs of his time – but he added that the success of the removal of the various irritants did not explain the cause of the disease. He even stated that traumatic bite problems are irritants and they too must be corrected. the fact that he recognized bite problems as a contributing factor so long ago is extraordinary, as this had been given little attention until more recent times.

In trying to understand the various causative problems involved in periodontal disease, he studied the different theories and found only confusion and contradiction. Dr. Price then instigated an intensive study of this dental disease.

He took a new approach, one which included an exhaustive analysis of clinical data and a thorough, careful examination of the characteristics present in those people with the disease. He then related the information collected to the patients’ blood and saliva chemistries and to the bacteria he found present.

For a long time Dr. Price could not acept the findings of his own studies as they seemed so paradoxical and far-fetched. In the close study of some 1400 cases, he eventually classified dental infections into three main categories along with a few minor ones.

These studies indicated a person’s biological inheritance play a major role, as the disease was more likely to occur in those who had one or both parents with pyorrhea.

Another important finding was that the early treatment of periodontal disease resulted in a complete cure, if all tartar deposits and/or ill-fitting fillings were replaced. In advanced cases of pyorrhea, if the removal of the irritants was the only treatment employed, much less improvement took place.

With local topical treatment of early causes with medications, even when irritating deposits were not removed, there was also marked improvement.

Cases treated by the injection of bactericidal drugs likewise resulted in improvement when early treatment of the disease was undertaken.

Dental Insurance. The Nhs In Dental Shambles

It’s truly shambolic say many dentists referring to the recent overhaul of the NHS dental service. The situation has become so bad that dentists are leaving the NHS in droves. Seven out of ten dentists have either quit the NHS or have signed their new NHS contract temporarily and “under dispute”. This means that come July this year they have the right to refuse NHS patients and switch entirely to private practice.

The hullabaloo is all about the new NHS contract which many dentists allege has been rushed out and forced upon them without proper consultation. A survey in the Daily Mail found that almost one third of dentists were still negotiating deals with their health authorities just three days before the deadline. The final rush has led to resentment, anxiety and confusion amongst dentists over what is in effect a complex packages of changes.

As far as the patient is concerned, the new contract greatly simplifies charges. Instead of some 400 different dental charges, there are now just three standard charges. Patients will be charged £15.50 for each check-up, £42.40 for fillings irrespective of the number of fillings and £189 for more complicated work such as crowns and bridges. Each of these charges pay for a complete course of treatment, irrespective of how long it takes and no matter how many teeth have to be treated.

But dentists believe that these three price bands will persuade many patients to delay treatment leading to an explosion of tooth decay. Says Dr Anthony Halperin from the Patients’ Association, “I’m concerned that many patients will wait until they need multiple treatments to try to get value for money. If that does happen, it is likely we will see a significant rise in tooth decay”.

This unprecedented exodus of dentists from the NHS means that up to 16 million patients could be left without state dental care. And there’s no guarantee that if you do decide to go private, you’ll find a dentist who’ll treat you. There are reports that dentists are becoming very choosey about who they’ll treat. It seems possible that some dentists will only accept patients who are well off or who have dental insurance.

So how do get insured? Well, without doubt, the Internet is going to be the place to find the best deals. Try searching under “dental insurance” and you’ll find lots of options. Of course, many dentists will leave details of one or two insurance schemes in their waiting room but dentists aren’t insurance experts and are not in a position to provide expert insurance advice.

Insurance companies are now widely promoting dental insurance but they’ll only sell their own products. We believe the best option is to find a specialised dental insurance broker. These brokers will essentially find you the best option from a wide array of dental insurance and dental capitalisation schemes. There is a third option – cash plans – but these tend to include a wide range of medical treatments with dental treatment being one small part of the insurance cover.

Dental Insurance

The problem for the patient is the wide range and complexity of the policies available. Almost every insurance policy is different with its own set of pros and cons. The broker’s job is to assess your needs and come up with suitable policies within your budget.

A typical policy helps to set the picture for what’s available. A policy with Western Provident pays the first 25% of each dental treatment but you claim up to £250 per year towards routine treatment such as check-ups, fillings and visits to the hygienist. Emergency dental treatment is often very expensive so you’re covered up to £1,000 per year with the maximum claim for accidental dental injury set at £250 per treatment. The cost? If you’re between18 and 49 the premium is £12.48. For those aged between 50 and 69 it’s £15.90 per month.

Capitalisation Schemes

A capitalisation scheme invariably works out the most expensive but it’s the option favoured by many dentists. Before you take out a capitalisation policy, your dentist carries out an assessment of your dental health and places you in one of five or so, treatment groups. The group you’re in then sets the cost of your scheme. The worse your dental condition, the more you pay.

For example, a capitalisation scheme from Denplan costs between £9 and £30 per month.

Cash Plans

The last alternative is a composite health cash plan. These plans cover you for a wide range of health treatments from dentistry to eye treatment, hospital treatment, physiotherapy, chiropody even allergy testing. Each treatment has a maximum claim value but they tend to be a bit on the mean side. In our view, you’re much better off with a dental insurance policy or a capitalisation scheme.

You pays your money and takes your choice!

Why Go For Teeth Whitening?

People are generally vain in nature and so they continuously look for ways to improve their appearances as they grow old. While other people go for physical improvements like liposuction, nose lift and face lift, there are people who are more concerned with keeping their pearly whites whiter than ever.

As people grow older their teeth grow darker due to their lifestyle and personal circumstances. A person’s teeth become darker through continuous exposure to staining drinks life coffee and colas and darkening substances like tar from cigarettes.

There are toothpastes that can whiten teeth and remove stains that have settled on the outer layer of the teeth but this will not solve real stains of the teeth. This is the reason why people resort to having their teeth bleached.

A tooth is bleached through the application of a gel containing carbamide peroxide. While this substance enters the teeth enamel and makes it lighter, it will not have the same effect on fillings or tooth crowns.

Teeth bleaching can be expensive and some dentists charge a minimum of $400 for the treatment. However, most people who have undergone teeth bleaching find it worth their while and their dollars. However, there are teeth bleaching substances which are directly sold through the internet. Buying these products is generally cheaper than going to the dentist since you are no longer charged the dentist fee and other overhead, just the price of the teeth whitening.

There is a tooth whitening product that comes in plastic strips and is applied by just placing the strips on the tooth area. Other teeth whitening products require the use of a tray to keep the gel fastened on the teeth while it is being bleached. Tooth whitening products for sale over the net comes with a detailed instruction book.

Aside from being expensive, whitening one’s teeth is not a one-time thing because it is not guaranteed to last long. People who continue with a lifestyle filled with staining agents like coffee, cigarette and wine will definitely need to whiten their teeth after a certain period.

Teeth whitening agents are generally safe but some causes the teeth to be more sensitive to changes in temperature. Almost everyone who undergoes teeth whitening will notice the difference and improvement in their pearly whites, the degree of whitening however depends on the amount of time the gel is placed on their teeth. Home-based whitening usually requires a minimum of two hours but if you require a whitening degree that is several shades lighter than your tooth color, then the dentist may require you to keep them overnight.

While teeth whitening can cause some discomfort, the effects can boost a person’s market value. After teeth whitening, you now have a more brilliant smile which can make you more attractive and younger looking.

The Most Affordable Cosmetic Dentistry Procedures

There are a lot of new, dramatically effective procedures in cosmetic dentistry. There are remarkable new products and technical procedures that have advanced recently to make dental services affordable and possible to more people than ever before. If you wish to have your teeth repaired, now you can have the treatment at an affordable cost.

At present, cosmetic dentistry is able to brighten, fill-in, shade, align and even replace teeth with the use of remarkable techniques and materials. When you have a healthy smile and attractive teeth, all the other benefits will follow. Improving your self-image encourages you to maintain good dental hygiene and at the same time improves your overall health.

There are so many dentistry procedures that are affordable. One is touch-ups. The yellow and brown stains and the white spots can be improved with touch-ups. The asymmetrical gum contours and uneven edges in your teeth can really make your smile look terrible. Simple corrective cosmetic dentistry procedures can change it dramatically.

The asymmetrical soft tissue contours can easily be corrected in just a single office visit. This requires minimal local anesthetic. Frequently, the symmetrical appearance of your gums can be as much as 50%of the total cosmetic value of your front teeth. This can be seen in the smiles of the young patients where their gums are displayed a lot when they are talking and smiling.

The super dark and super white spots can be reduced within one office visit as well. The acidic-micro-abrasion scrubs are affordable and helpful in clearing these problems. These unattractive spots can be safely removed with just one visit to your dentist using this technique, and the good thing is that it does not require the use of anesthesia.

The easiest way to a dazzling smile is through teeth whitening. This can be done at home or at a dental office with tray based bleaching products. If whitening is done in the office, it’s easier and more effective than doing it at home. Also important is the condition of the teeth and if the whitening used comes from a good brand name.

There are dentists who give their patients bleaching kits that they can take home. These kits usually work faster than the ones bought over the counter because they contain stronger amounts of whitening agents. Also the trays are custom fitted which helps to avoid gum irritation from excess whitener resting on the gums.

Cosmetic dentistry has dramatically changed the way teeth are improved. With the arrival of newer and more efficient treatments to whiten teeth, our smiles can now look (and feel) better than ever before. Cosmetic dentistry procedures are the best help in keeping up a great looking, healthy smile.